It's that thing of like when a midget runs a blog and wants to be on SNL one day. Eagle Scout, male, 19, straight, white, Gainesville/West Palm Beach FL, he/him pronouns, ENTP

 

backpat:

captoring:

4w-k:

all time favorite quote c:

shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder 
your favorite quote. is. shoulder. shoulder. shoulder. shoulder.

backpat:

captoring:

4w-k:

all time favorite quote c:

shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder 

your favorite quote. is. shoulder. shoulder. shoulder. shoulder.

image

fotojournalismus:

Ferguson, Mo. | August 13, 2014

1. A protester throws back a smoke bomb while clashing with police. (Mario Anzuoni/Reuters)

2. Riot police clear a street with smoke bombs. (Mario Anzuoni/Reuters)

3. Police surround and detain two people in a car. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

4. Police officers work their way north on West Florissant Avenue, clearing the road with the use of tear gas and smoke bombs. (Robert Cohen/AP)

5. A police officer patrols a business district. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

6. A demonstrator, protesting the shooting death of teenager Michael Brown, stands his ground as police fire tear gas. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

7. An explosive device deployed by police flies in the air. (Jeff Roberson/AP)

8. A demonstrator holds up a Pan-African flag to protest the killing of Michael Brown. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

9. A device fired by police goes off in the street. (Jeff Roberson/AP)

10. A demonstrator throws back a tear gas container after tactical officers worked to break up a group of bystanders on Chambers Road and West Florissant in St. Louis. (Robert Cohen/AP)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)

toxicmp3:

foxandderby:

This picture of the audience’s reaction to Omarosa on Bethenny Frankel’s talk show after saying, “You [white people] get to walk around and be mediocre and still get rewarded with things.” deserves the Pulitzer for Photography

toxicmp3:

foxandderby:

This picture of the audience’s reaction to Omarosa on Bethenny Frankel’s talk show after saying, “You [white people] get to walk around and be mediocre and still get rewarded with things.” deserves the Pulitzer for Photography

yourackdisciprine:

A recent trend on RTE (Irish TV) chat shows - random audience members turning to stare into the cameras during audience cut-aways.

asylum-art:

Lorenzo Nanni born in Italy, is a 34 years old textile artist living and working in Paris. He specialized in embroidery.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.




This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.